North Dakota Shines

Even though North Dakota may not have purple mountain majesties, its waves of grain provide vivid greens, yellows, and oranges.  This state has it’s own beauty.

According to Wikipedia, “North Dakota has long been known as the most agricultural state in the Union.”

However, just like most farms in the United States, the farms have increased in acreage but have decreased in numbers.  When Dan and I travel the back roads of Minnesota and Wisconsin, we would consider ourselves lucky to happen upon two abandoned properties.  The abandoned properties that we stumbled upon in North Dakota were plentiful and we even joked at one time that we had hit our quota for the entire year just in this one trip.   Some of the most beautiful and interesting properties that I have ever had the privilege of visiting were on this trip. Keep your eyes peeled for my favorite properties coming soon!

Researching the population of North Dakota, I came across this wonderful article on the Bakken Shale Oil Fields at nationalgeographic.com titled:

The New Oil Landscape
The fracking frenzy in North Dakota has boosted the U.S. fuel supply—but at what cost?

In recent years, the state has had a strong economy.  Much of this growth is not due to what they are growing in the fields,  but has been due to what they are pulling from the earth in the Bakken Oil Fields of the Western portion of the state. In 2012, the United States Census Bureau estimated that North Dakota’s entire population for the state was 699,000. Whereas the 2012 population for Denver, Colorado alone was 634,000 and the cities of Minneapolis/St. Paul total population was an estimated 670,000.  From those facts,  take a look at the map below of the light that is seen in certain areas of the United States from space.

Bakken Oil Fields

In an article written on Oilprice.com titled, “Bakken Companies Sued for Wasting Gas Royalties”, The light that you see on the image of the United states is the result of the surge of natural gas flaring in the Bakken shale.  HOLY CRAP!

“The result is that North Dakota, over the Bakken shale oil fields, looks like a bonfire party, with at least 1500 bonfires at any given time, flaring excess natural gas that can’t make it to the market. It’s cheaper to burn than to build pipelines to transport it.”

ND-Oil-Spill_Sidd

In this Oct. 8, 2013 photo provided by the North Dakota Health Department, a vacuum truck cleans up oil in near Tioga, N.D. The North Dakota Health Department says more than 20,000 barrels of crude oil have spewed out of a Tesoro Corp. oil pipeline in a wheat field in northwestern North Dakota. Officials say the 20,600-barrel spill is among the largest recorded in the state and was discovered on Sept. 29 by a farmer harvesting wheat about nine miles south of Tioga. (AP Photo/North Dakota Health Department)

Read more on oil spills in North Dakota here: newsbreak-100s-of-nd-oil-spills-not-publicized

I will be interested in how this all changes the face of North Dakota… Only Time will tell.  Take a trip down that dirt road with us as we travel the back roads of the eastern portion of North Dakota.  I also encourage you to read these articles on the Bakken Oil Fields of ND.  This industry is not only affecting the driftless areas of Minnesota and Wisconsin, It is affecting the Eastern and Western coasts of The United States as well.

So open up the car door and jump inside- Don’t forget your seatbelt!

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15 thoughts on “North Dakota Shines

  1. Wonderful photos. You do North Dakota proud. 🙂

  2. Another memorable series of photos. My favorite is the old TV set and the reflection.

  3. maurycyharsze says:

    As always amazing!

  4. Your images capture well the ruggedness, the isolation, the rural-ness I always associate with North Dakota. The photo which grabs my attention is the building on the brink of falling into the water. Its positioning raises the questions: Why is it there, hanging like that? Was this shot in a flood plain?

    • You are absolutely right in that it does raise questions as to how the building came to be in that very spot 🙂 The area around that image had more of a slop to the landscape (not much though) so yes, it could be an area that water runs of from the fields. There was a “road” that ended in a shallow portion of this small body of water. We ran into many “marshlands” or small ponds on our travels through out the area.

  5. These are great! North Dakota’s department of tourism needs to get in touch with you. 😉

  6. Jane Lurie says:

    Very interesting post and important observations.

  7. I always enjoy your images so much. They are so unique and the places you discover on your ‘walkabouts’ have so much depth.

    I love your blog, but have one comment – the color on the font on your home page was a bit hard for me to read. Once I got into the post though, all was fine. Thanks! Emily

  8. Ajaytao2010 says:

    Lovely pics

  9. […] North Dakota Ghosts- The old school in Forbes, North Dakota Abandoned Outside Forbes, ND Following the rails of North Dakota North Dakota Shines […]

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