The Templar’s Church

As we made our way south from Duncannon, we stumbled upon this little gem… Ruins of a Templar’s Church. There are only scant remains of the original Templar Church, but the medieval tower is quite impressive. It stands four stories high and has crenellations on top. The old 19th century church has all of its walls standing but is completely roofless and is joined to the tower by an extension where the entrance door lies.

The Knights Templar first utilized this spot by building a wooden tower here. The current stone tower that can be seen was built after the Templar lands were given to their rivals the Knights Hospitaller. The more modern church building is the old Church of Ireland church that was used up until the newer St Mogues church in Fethard was built.

The Order of the Knights Templar were originally founded in 1119 with the responsibility of protecting pilgrims making the journey to Jerusalem. While the military arm of the order was battling in the Crusades many lands throughout Europe were given to the order to help fund their efforts.

Following the Anglo-Norman Invasion of Ireland King Henry II granted the lands to the south of a line drawn from Duncannon to Baginbun. Following the dissolution of the order on Friday 13th, 1307 the lands were given to their rival order, the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem, also known as the Knights Hospitalier. Three stone towers still stand from the time of the Hospitaliers, built on the same locations as those used by the Templars. One at Ballyhack, one at Killoggan and this one at Templetown. ~Hookpenisula.com

See you at our next stop; stay safe my friends!

To see Dan’s post from this lucky find, click HERE

Duncannon Fort, County Wexford, Ireland

Once we crossed the River Barrow on the ferry from Passage East, we stopped at Duncannon Beach to stretch our legs and take in the sites. The beach was so peaceful during our visit; however, knowing this site has been utilized by many to protect from invaders since earlier than the 12th century, I am sure it has seen its share of troubled waters.

A fort was built on this site by Normans in the 12th century, and there may have been an earlier earthen fort built by Gaelic Irish. The present fort was built in 1587–88 by Queen Elizabeth I to defend Waterford from possible invasion from the Spanish Armada.

Duncannon Fort is an impressive presentation of a bastioned fortress perched on the side of the stunning Hook Peninsula, County Wexford, part of Ireland’s Ancient East. This historic structure has gathered countless intriguing and awe-inspiring stories over its 450-year history and holds one of the best vantage points to take in the beautiful Waterford Estuary from.  Further information can be found at www.duncannonfort.ie

To see Dan’s images from this site, click HERE

County Waterford, Ireland

We started our day off at Colneen House B&B in Tramore just like every other morning in Ireland – BREAKFAST!

In avoiding major metropolitan areas as much as possible, we made our way towards a ferry town – Passage East through Crooke town. We stopped for coffee and noticed St. John’s Baptist Church and decided to take a closer look. After this brief stop for some morning coffee and a quick adventure, we hopped on the ferry and away we went! Our day was just beginning; see you at our next stop.

To see Dan’s post of this portion of our trip, click here