Judge C.R. Magney State Park

In 1963, the park was renamed Judge C. R. Magney State Park in honor of this late advocate who helped establish 11 state parks and wayside rests along the North Shore. Over the years, many parcels of land have been added to the state park, which now totals over 4600 acres.

Dan and I were excited to see what this park had in store for our viewing pleasure. We were not disappointed, however, I would have to say this 2 mile round trip trail, which includes over 200 ascending and descending stairs, is for advanced hikers but will lead you to the most famous formation on the Brule River… The Devil’s Kettle.

Half of the Brule River plunges 50 feet into a pool as it continues on its way to Lake Superior; the other 50 percent disappears into what we call the Devil’s Kettle. The famous cauldron is rumored not to have a bottom. Researchers have dropped brightly colored dyes and other objects into the Devil’s Kettle without result of finding the water’s outlet. This formation is another example of the amazing wonders Mother Nature can create.

Information taken from the MN DNR website about the geology of this area may explain a wee bit, but the mystery of Devil’s Kettle will remain hidden for the time being.

The bedrock exposed along Lake Superior’s North Shore has a geologic history that goes back some 1.1 billion years. During the dramatic volcanic activity of that time, molten lava poured through great fissures that developed in the Earth’s crust. One particular flow complex, the Devil’s Kettle rhyolite flow, visible along the Brule River, is thought to be as much as 770 feet thick. As these flows accumulated, the land along the rift zone sank to form a great basin, into which huge volumes of sediment were deposited after volcanic activity ended. A long period of erosion followed. The local Sawtooth Mountains of the Grand Marais area are the remnants of these great, tilted lava flows. Much more recently, glaciers took their toll on the area as massive ice sheets gouged out the Lake Superior basin, mainly from the post-volcanic sediments, and scoured the bedrock surface. In Cook County, where the park is located, the glacial action eroded more earth and bedrock than it deposited.

We enjoyed this day immensely and may have even shed a few pounds that day. Please enjoy the views from in and around Judge C.R. Magney State Park.

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17 thoughts on “Judge C.R. Magney State Park

  1. Yuvathi says:

    wish i could go there someday…. really lovely pics! 🙂

  2. Dan Traun says:

    Loved this park. Devil’s Kettle is a very mysterious feature there. Wonderful photos honey.

  3. Marneymae says:

    I am loving this series of posts about parks you’ve visited!
    I’m collecting them in a gmail folder: “places to visit”
    I hope to see it some in the near future
    Thanks for sharing the beauty & wonder

  4. words4jp says:

    These photos are glorious.

  5. dave says:

    Really enjoyed your description of the Devil’s Kettle. What a mystery!

  6. Heather says:

    your photos are so beautiful Cynthia…love the colors of the wild flowers, they always make me smile!

  7. Thank you Heather! Have a great day 🙂

  8. kirablue813 says:

    I love the photos you took. They are amazing and it is wonderful to see the Earth and what it is made of. Don’t you?

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